The Advantages To Becoming A Travel Nurse

To all the nurses out there who love nursing and traveling: did you know that you can combine both of your loves in a career as a traveling nurse? The field of travel nursing has several benefits over other areas of nursing. Let’s look at some of the outstanding benefits you’ll enjoy in a career as a traveling nurse.

One of these benefits includes travel around the country working at jobs that can last anywhere from just a few weeks to as long as a year. Although many would not necessarily consider it a benefit because it is a part of the job, to many others it is a major benefit. A job as a traveling nurse allows you to work in many new areas. Often times these are areas that you might not normally consider for a vacation, but they are often in some of the most beautiful parts of the country. You can see many places across the United States as you work and you’ll have plenty of time to take in all the sites.

Most travel nurse agencies offer a wide variety of benefits to nurses. Traveling nurses are some of the best-paid nurses in the country. Usually, the pay ranges from $21 to $48 an hour. This will vary based on your level of experience in your field as well as the location of the assignment. Some areas of the country will pay much better than others. Some agencies offer a number of bonuses, including sign on and completion bonuses. Some even offer bonuses when you renew your contract for at least 13 weeks. Loyalty bonuses sometimes offered include monetary rewards, upgrades in housing and paid vacations. Most agencies will also provide referral bonuses for any nurse completing a full assignment that you have referred.

Another major benefit often included when you sign on to travel with an agency is wonderful health benefits. Most agencies furnish fully paid medical insurance for you with the option to add your family at a reasonable expense. Also, often included with your benefits package, are vision and dental insurance, life insurance, long- and short-term disability and accident coverage. Exact benefits will vary from agency to agency, so it is important to investigate what is offered by each company that you speak with.

Many companies will furnish retirement plans, such as a 401K plan usually available after just one month of service. Roadside assistance packages, such as AAA, are frequently provided. Continuing education is often provided at no cost to you and some agencies will reimburse continuing education.

Travel nursing is not the perfect opportunity for everyone, so you must consider the pros and cons carefully. It is also important to investigate any agency that you are considering signing up with. Ask the agency you are considering to speak with some of the traveling nurses who are already a part of their company. A thorough search of the internet to see what others say about the agency can also turn up some interesting information.

There is such a high demand for nurses who are able, and willing, to travel for their jobs today. The benefits, rewards and bonuses available to those who decide to become a traveling nurse seem endless. Travel nursing could be just the shot in the arm your career needs if you are becoming tired of the same thing day after day, year after year. It could just be the change you are looking for.

Four Major Functions Provided by a Real Estate Agent That You Can Do Yourself

Selling a home entails four major functions that are usually performed by a real estate agent. If we take the mystery out of those functions, they start looking as if we can do them without an agent. And you can!

1. Pricing your property

The first thing that an agent will do for you is help price your property. You don’t want to offer your home for sale at double its market value because it just won’t sell. Likewise, you don’t want to offer your home for sale at half its market value because you would just be cheating yourself of that price difference. If the market is such that your house in your neighborhood in your city is worth about $200,000 then you want to sell it for that. If you have made additions to the house that might make it worth more, then you want to add those items to it. The real estate agent has a lot of that data at their fingertips through their subscriptions and through their knowledge of the marketplace.

You can do this pricing yourself as long as you don’t let your ego get the better of common sense. You can find out what homes are selling for by cruising your neighborhood and checking out homes for sale to see what they are priced at. You can check to see what they sold for by visiting your tax authorities. Most municipalities and counties require that all deed transfers be recorded as a matter of public record. You can access that data through the internet if your municipality offers it, or you can go look it up in person where the internet is not used. Just make sure you are pricing your 3 bedroom 2 bath house with other 3 bedroom 2 bath houses rather than a 2 bedroom or 5 bedroom house.

2. Marketing your property

Marketing real estate is a sort of catch-all word for advertising the home as being for sale and then showing the property to prospective buyers through appointments or open-houses. The most important and probably most costly marketing activity is advertising the house. There is one real estate agent around here that states in their commercials that they spend between $1,000 and $1,500 per HOUSE while claiming that many agents only spend less than $500 per month for all of the houses that they list.

You can perform all 3 of these marketing functions. Who would be better to show a home or to have an open-house than the resident of the home — just do not let your ego get in the way and react defensively to reasonable buying questions. The advertising should be fairly simple as well. You are just as qualified to create want-ads for your local and regional papers and classified magazines as long as you model your ads after the ones that you will be competing for attention with. There are some advertising sites that require that all of their advertisers be real estate agents. You might try circumventing that restriction by offering a real estate agent a small fee to list your property on those restricted sites. The worse they can do is say “No” and a different agent might be more cooperative.

3. Contract exchange and negotiation.

Real estate agents act as intermediaries between the seller and the buyer. They take a contract proposal from the prospective buyer or their agent and present it to the seller. This goes on with price changes or with feature additions and removals until both the seller and the buyer agree on the selling price and property conditions.

There should be no question that you can do this yourself as the seller. After all, the agent would have to come to you anyway to get your approval and signature. Once again, this is where you need to put your ego and pride to the side. At this stage, all of your advertising and pricing work has come to fruition and you have a buyer negotiating with you. The worse thing you could do is to react defensively. You just participate in a give and take during the process as if it were for someone else.

4. Preparing the final paperwork and closing the sale

The real estate agent is usually the one to give all of the closing information to the title company and lawyers so that the deed to the property can be transferred from the seller to the buyer with no problems. This is when checks are transferred and mortgages paid off. It is also when the commission check is given to the real estate broker for dispersal to his agent.

You can do these things also. You are the one that has handled the paperwork up to now. You are the one that is ready for your mortgage to be paid off. You are the one ready to receive a check for the difference between what you owe on the mortgage and the selling price of the house. Most of this information is put on the HUD-1 form by the title company. In fact the major role of the agent here is to hold your hand and collect the commission check. Again, these tasks can be handled with a minimum of activity on your part. Any legal requirements can be farmed out to a lawyer for a much smaller fee than the agent’s commission.

Pricing, marketing, negotiating, and closing are all functions that are required to sell a property. They are all tasks normally handled by a real estate agent. They are also tasks that you can do yourself at a cost far less than 5% of the selling price of your house.

Overcoming Linguistic Hurdles in International Business With Professional Translation Services

Language barriers are among the biggest hurdles in today’s global marketplace. While communication technology is improving continuously, the need for accurate human understanding continues to be paramount, despite the latest technological innovations in communication. All the investments in state-of-the art communications devices can come to naught if you run up against a language barrier.

Without proper knowledge and use of language no social institution can function properly, and conducting a profitable business in a foreign country is next to impossible.

Globalization and global communication have made it easy now to advertise and market your products and services all across the world. However, in order to conduct business smoothly in a foreign country, you need to understand the cultural diversity that prevails in your target markets. Using professional language translation services is one of the basic and necessary ingredients in order to succeed abroad. Today the world has become a small global village in which the demand for translations service providers is rising exponentially to keep pace with globalization.

If you want to expand your market and sell your products and services internationally, you need to promote your product in a language that is understandable by the population you are targeting. Translations service providers make every aspect of your business comprehensible for your target audience. To conduct business internationally, you will need to get a wide range of documents translated, starting with product catalogs, brochures or manuals.

For instance, if you are planning to launch a range of products in a new market in a foreign non-English-speaking country, you will need to package your products, prepare the marketing collateral and advertising material in the language of your target country.

In addition, when you start operations in other countries, there are various legal documents that need to be completed and filed. These legal documents may include a wide range of corporate, marketing, sales, purchasing and collaboration agreements, they may also include tenders, labour contracts, affidavits, patent applications and more. Since translating legal documents is a complex task, it is imperative that you select a professional translation company, which may be a translation service in Vancouver or a translation firm in Toronto that provides professional translations done by carefully selected translators who specialize in legal documents.

Apart from legal documents, there are numerous financial documents that may need to be translated so that you can conveniently share crucial financial information with business partners, lenders and financing partners as well as shareholders in foreign countries. Financial documents can range widely and include annual reports, financial statements, sales projections, investor updates, investment proposals, insurance claims, and many more.

Similarly businesses dealing with pharmaceutical manufacturing, medical equipment manufacturers and insurance agencies turn to translation services providers to translate various medical documents such as clinical trial documents, pharmacology test reports, instruction manuals, patients records, packaging labels of medical equipments, medical questionnaires and charts and more.

Marketing is another subject that will require professional translation services. If you have a website and you want people to buy products or services from your website, you have to get your web content translated in the language which your target audience understands. Suppose you are a Toronto-based publisher and want to sell your publications in China, your website would need to feature both languages, an English version and Chinese version. To develop content for the site and other marketing material such as catalogs, etc., you would need to hire a reliable translation Toronto company.

Whether you need legal translations, financial, medical or other translations, make sure to approach a professional and reputable translation service provider, which could be providing translations services in Toronto or offering translations in Vancouver that ensures that all your translation needs will be handled by translation experts in your particular subject matter.

First Travel Nurse Assignment – Frequently Asked Questions

Question: I decided to switch to be a travel nurse instead of permanent placement how do I decide where to go?
Congratulations! You have made the first step toward an exciting career of travel nursing. Choosing where you want to go will be one of the questions the travel nursing staffing agency will ask you. Since each travel nurse assignment is approximately 13 weeks long, you do not need to worry about planning where you want to go months in advance. However, there are several factors in deciding your first assignment as a travel nurse.

o Suppose you have a family member whom you haven’t seen in awhile, you could select a location near them so you can have time to visit and form a relationship. Additionally, you may know of a sick relative who needs assistance, so you can choose a destination from your nursing staffing agency nearby.
o Dreamed of visiting the Grand Canyon or the Rio Grande? Would you like to vacation in Hawaii or near Wine Country? Ask your travel nursing staffing agency about jobs near these destinations.
o Do you want to escape the summer heat? Ask about a travel nursing job in Minnesota or Oregon where the summers are beautiful and full of outdoor summer activities.
o Ask your travel nursing staffing agency recruiter about top destinations or ask other travel nurses where they like to travel and work.

Question: What kind of uniform will I need?
Uniforms are often provided to you. You will likely receive them upon your arrival. Each facility requires something different as far as work clothes or uniforms most of the time. It is, however, best to bring a couple pairs of comfortable shoes and an extra set of scrubs, in case your uniform is not ready the first day of your assignment or in rare occasions not provided to you. Also, keep receipts of all nurse uniforms as well as laundering expenses for tax purposes.

Question: What do I need to do before leaving on a travel nurse assignment?
If you know the exact date you will be leaving for your first travel nurse assignment, then it is a good idea to have your mail forwarded to your new housing address. You can give the post office start and stop dates for mail forwarding. It may take up to a week to get your mail at your new location, so make arrangements with any monthly bills you have to pay beforehand.

Inform your nursing staffing agency of your travel dates, so they can inform the employer when to expect you as well as how to reach you during transit. Also, tell your family and friends of your new assignment address, phone number, travel route and where to reach you in case of an emergency as well as the number of your nursing staffing agency. Carry a cell phone and car charger with you at all times; you may need to call someone during transit if you have an emergency.

Carry a folder to hold all your travel expenses, receipts, professional licenses, CEUs, uniform cost and cleaning, fuel for your car, airfare and lodging. Having an organized folder for keeping all these items will save you at tax time.

Finally, it is best to have enough money for meals, fuel, and incidentals for at least two weeks. If you have not set up a bank account at your new location or if you do not have direct deposit, your paychecks may be delayed and you’ll be without accessible funds.

Question: How do I find personal and repair services while working as a travel nurse?
Starting in a new location whether as a job transfer or a travel nurse can be daunting; however, knowing that you will be working with other professionals who are available to refer you to credible and affordable services.

Since travel nurses often have the option of staying in medical staffing housing, you won’t need to worry about home maintenance repairs. While you may need to find a beauty salon or barber, auto repair shop and affordable grocery stores, the same people you work with will be your greatest resource.

Other places to find information about local businesses can be found on Angie’s List and Yelp, which provide reviews and ratings by consumers. Almost every town also has a travel bureau or a chamber of commerce, which have plentiful of resources and recommendations for retail stores and services.

Question: As a travel nurse, do I have to accept an assignment right away after one ends?
No, you do not have to take another assignment right away. As a travel nurse you can take a break between assignments whether it is for one week, two weeks or more, and then choose your next assignment. Travel nursing is not only a great opportunity to explore new places and work assignments, but you also are able to plan your vacation between assignments.

A great recruiter will however follow up with you and talk about your plans before your assignment ends so there is a smooth transition if you want to take advantage of another assignment right away and the many bonuses and rewards that are often times offered for taking another assignment right away. The option is yours!

Question: This is my first travel nurse assignment, what if I have problems adjusting to work schedule or personnel? Whom do I contact?
Medical staffing agencies will be able to work with your needs and special requests regarding work assignments, travel costs and housing before your first assignment; this will help alleviate your first travel nurse assignment problems.

However, if you feel like the travel nurse assignment is not what you expected, you should talk to your head nurse or physician to solve any miscommunication or task responsibilities. Notify your staffing recruiter as well to make sure they know and help resolve issues so that others are in the know as well. You may also know of another nurse whom you can confide in about any concerns you have. It is best to talk to someone before issues interfere with your travel nurse assignment.

If you think of other questions before you leave for your first travel nurse assignment, call your nursing staffing agency because they will have an answer for you when you need it. Rely on their experience to guide you and keep your confidence levels high before during and after travel.

Effective Bird Control For Healthcare Centers & Hospitals

It’s no secret that people who are already sick are more vulnerable to contracting diseases.And one potentially unhealthful source of disease is bird waste. As a hospital administrator, you are no doubt aware of the problems pest birds can cause. Many species of birds, including pigeons, starlings and sparrows, often gather to roost on a hospital’s roof, under parking structures, in receiving bays and loading docks, and around exterior employee lunch and snack areas. Without bird control, you soon have a noisy, smelly and potentially dangerous problem on your hands.

Keep in mind that a single pigeon can excrete up to 25 pounds of droppings per year. The bacteria, fungal agents and ectoparasites in bird droppings and nesting materials have been known to carry any of 60 diseases–including histoplasmosis, encephalitis, salmonella, meningitis, and toxoplasmosis, even the West Nile virus.

No less harmful is bird fecal dust carried into hospitals through rooftop heating, ventilation and air-conditioning ducts. Birds often build nests around air handling equipment, ducts, compressors and other vented pathways. Dried by wind and sun, this disease-infested dust gets sucked into HVAC systems. The fine particles can quickly spread diseases throughout a hospital or medical center.

Hospital administrators should also be aware of the negative visual impact bird droppings, nests and other debris can have on a hospital’s image. Finally, bird droppings can cause dangerous slip-and-fall hazards–a huge legal liability for any institution.

Today’s Bird Control Measures

Hospitals and healthcare centers are somewhat restricted in their use of pest bird control measures. They certainly can’t use firearms, noise cannons or fireworks. And poisons present too much of a liability. Besides, federal, state and local wildlife protection ordinances forbid the use of lethal or harmful bird control measures. Fortunately, there are several highly effective bird proofing solutions currently available that are safe, sane and humane.

Bird Spikes

The good thing about Bird Spikes is that they prevent many species of large birds from landing in the first place. Suddenly, rooftops, ledges, signs, light fixtures and other elevated areas are off-limits to birds. Bird Spikes come in rows of spiked strips. And you can get them in either rigid U.V.-resistant unbreakable polycarbonate or high strength, durable stainless steel. The stainless steel spikes come in 3-, 5- and 8-inch widths; the plastic spikes (which cost slightly less) come in 3-, 5- and 7-inch widths. Plastic spikes are ideal for use near antenna arrays since they won’t interfere with radiated RF energy. You can get bird spikes in a non-reflective metal finish or a variety of colors–like white, tan, gray, black, brown, brick red and crystal clear. There’s also a no-gap spike that’s easy to affix to curved surfaces.

If your hospital or healthcare center is being invaded by large birds like gulls, try the Mega Spike. Its 7-inch spikes made of marine grade stainless steel will make sure these birds get the point and leave. There’s also the Gutter Spike, ideal for keeping large pest birds out of gutters or drains. Look for gutter spikes that have adjustable clamps at the base; these allow the spikes to be easily attached to the lip of a gutter.

Lastly, Birds Spikes look dangerous, but they are harmless to birds or people. They have even been approved by a number of humane groups worldwide–including the U.S. Humane Society and PICAS (Pigeon Control Advisory Service).

Sonic Bird Deterrents

Ideal for use in certain areas of a hospital or healthcare center, Typically, Sonic Bird Deterrents emit predator and distress calls that frighten pest birds but are basically just Uncategorized sounds that are not unpleasant to humans. Some highly versatile sonic systems emit distress and predator calls for as many as 22 types of birds. The sounds are cycled every few minutes to convince pest birds that they best leave or risk being attacked. Sonic Bird Deterrents are an ideal bird control solution for deterring pigeons, crows, starlings, swallows, gulls, woodpeckers, sparrows, grackles, cormorants and many other birds.

Bird Netting

To keep pest birds out of certain specific areas–like eaves, overhangs, patios, and parking structure recesses–there’s Bird Netting. This barrier bird control measure is available in various cuts and mesh sizes. For large birds like pigeons or seagulls, use a 1-1/8-inch to 2-inch mesh size. Sparrows or starlings, on the other hand are best excluded using a 3/4-inch mesh net. The best bird repellent netting will meet ISO 1806 protocols, is U.V. stabilized, flame resistant and rot- and water-proof. In areas where electrical conductivity or radio frequency interference is a problem, non-conductive netting is often used. Also note that netting now comes in various colors– including white, stone and black–to match a structure’s color scheme.

Electric-Tracks
A great spot deterrent for ledges, rooflines, eaves, signs and most flat or curved surfaces, Electric Tracks impart a mild electrical shock when birds land on their surface. This is an ideal bird control device for use against a wide variety of pest birds–including pigeons, sparrows, gulls, starlings and crows. The best electric tracks feature a low-profile design that makes them almost invisible. The strips of electrified track are usually powered by an AC charger or solar charger. One manufacturer uses copper knitted wire mesh in a continuous tube-in-tube stocking design. This gives the track greater conductivity, strength and reliability. The copper mesh is resists corrosion and will stand up to alkali and acidic environments.
Bird Slope
These angled, slippery PVC panels known simply as Bird Slope, won’t allow pest birds enough of a grip to land. After a few unsuccessful attempts, they just slide off like water off a goose. Bird slopes are easily installed, tucking unnoticeably into ledges, eaves, beams and other 90-degree areas pest birds often nest. The best panels are U.V. protected and sun and weather resistant. They deter a wide range of birds, including swallows, starlings, pigeons and seagulls. Some panels have a “snap-on” extender, which allows them to adapt more easily to wider ledges and coverage areas.
Bird Scare Deterrents

These inexpensive bird control devices make pest birds too nervous to nest. There’s Flash tape, an iridescent material that shimmers and crackles in the sunlight and breeze to scare pest birds. And Bird Scare Balloons, which, emblazoned with lifelike reflective predator eyes, bob and weave menacingly in the breeze to make birds really uncomfortable.

Thrifty Car Rentals – Tripling Your Savings

Thrifty car rentals are becoming popular as an option for people who hardly drive their car except on extended trips. Then there are those people who would prefer not to use their own car on trips over uncertain roads for fear of the wear and tear in will cause. People also rent cars to upgrade or downgrade on the size of the car that they own. For instance, an architect might own a large SUV which he uses for bringing his materials to his projects. For non-business trips, the car has much more room that he requires and more engine power than he ever needs to avail of. So he visits a thrifty car rental to get a smaller car for his daily use. Again people might want to rent a car because they are interested in buying that exact same model but just want to try it out first for a week before actually making that purchase.

If you are thinking of a renting a car, you should know that they usually cost less than the up-front price. This is because thrifty car rental companies offer discount bonuses on most cars and at most times of the year. Discount bonuses can shave of from 10% to 50% of the amount you need to pay after renting it. Price shave-offs can be availed of if you rent on weekends or during off-peak season. You can also have price reduction on the average cost if you rent for a week or a month. The specifics for extended rental discounts may vary from company to company, but they are always there.

Right now, the going price for high-powered cars, has gone down with the recession. Due to the need to save, people are buying cars with less power and smaller build. The result is that cars like the SUV are rented out instead of sold. Now would be the right time to try out renting a SUV from a thrifty car rental. This car is ideal for outdoor adventures on virgin terrain, like camping in the wild or fishing out in a secluded lake. The SUV is also ideal for visiting friends who live in isolated areas.

Before renting for an extended period, you need to consider the amenities or accessories that are included or excluded for monthly or yearly rental plans. Before settling on a monthly rental plan, be sure to calculate whether renting daily for 28 days will cost more than an outright 30-day plan. There are some thrifty car rental companies whose price structure sets a higher basic rate for monthly plans. If such is the case, there may be amenities or add-ons for monthly rentals that you are not aware of. Ask the personnel about it.

Other than the basic discounts on the rental fees of thrifty car rentals, some offer discount coupons for tourist spots, hotels and restaurants. These discount coupons are issued by the establishments to encourage more visitors to their place. Among these establishments, you have Disneyland, Sea World and even Universal Studios. Holiday Inn and Grand Hyatt are two hotels that offer discount coupons for travelers.

Buy E-Cigarettes: Some Useful Features

Electronic Cigarettesare the latest buzz word for all those who want to quit smoking. This smokeless device can help curb the smoking habit because it can give the same sensation that comes from smoking a normal cigarette. Only here, the carcinogens and toxins that are found in normal cigarette smoke are absent, thus making them safer. Buy E-Cigarettes for healthier lifestyle.

How do electronic cigarettes work? The device’s mechanism is pretty simple. When a person inhales through the device a sensor inside the device activates the atomizer which heats the cartridge that holds the nicotine solution. The vapor that arises from the cartridge is inhaled by the user. The LED light indicator at the end of the device is turned on to indicate device functioning and also vapor flow.

E-Cigarette cartridges can be affixed at the end of the device and they have a nicotine solution. You can get cartridges with varying nicotine levels. Most people tend to go in for the stronger nicotine solution cartridge first and then shift over to cartridges that are lower in nicotine content. The cartridge can also contain food essences, this giving a Uncategorized flavor that does not have any nicotine. Food essences include flavors such as almond, cherry, mint, chocolate, lemon, and mango and so on. The device is powered by a lithium ion battery that has to be charged from time to time. A charger device is provided with starter kits. It can also be purchased separately. Life of the device’s battery varies with the brand. This is an important factor to consider when you Buy E-Cigarettes.

E-Cigarette devices can be in the form of two-piece device or three-piece devices. Two-piece devices are easier to handle as they have the nicotine pad built into the cartridge and this eliminates stains on finger tips. The atomizer is built into the cartridge so there is a new atomizer available that isn’t clogged with old juice, which can minimize smoke volume. In a three-part ecig, the cartridge has to be loaded into the atomizer and this can make the process of changing cartridges a little longer.

Electronic cigarettes are available in different styles such as pen style, disposable style, mini ecig, ecig cigars, ecig piper and much more. When choosing one, check which style is most comfortable and also look into the battery life offered by the brand before buying.

Buy E-Cigarettes to gain the benefits of harmless smoking. This device can change your smoking habits and will encourage you to lead a healthier lifestyle. Smoking is the cause of preventable death all over the world and using E-Cigarettes is a step that can help prevention.

Online Shopping for Clothes: Tips and Facts

Nowadays online shopping for fashionable clothes has become very popular all over the world. It seems that online shopping for apparel is much more convenient. Consumers have this great opportunity to browse an international clothing market at the simple click of a button.

Undoubtedly, online stores for clothes have become the new hit. Today you can buy everything from an e-store – from the socks and the underwear, through women and men tops to the sportswear and the coats, including fashion accessories such as hats, bags, you name it. You can shop while drinking your coffee at home, during your break at the office, at any time, at any place. You had a busy day at work and it’s already late in the day, and you have a party approaching – the perfect solution is to lounge on your couch and start browsing for online shop offering clothes that match your style. Also, many e-shops make big season sales and discounts for holidays.

Yet with all the advantages of the online shopping for clothes, there are some flaws. You are not able to try out your clothes to see if they fit you, you can’t feel the fabric either. I am offering you some easy-to-follow tips for a successful online shopping inspired by the many online shopping woes of customers around the world.

  1. Look at the return policy
  2. Before you buy your clothes online, read the return policy. Loyal clothing e-shops offer returns. Mistakes happen and it is always good idea to have a backup plan. Make sure that if it turns out that you need a different size, or you have changed your opinion and you want to buy something else, you can return your purchase to change it.

  3. Chart sizes
  4. Take into consideration that different countries have different sizes. Many customers underestimate this fact. When you are choosing your size, make sure you choose the right one. Most online shops for clothes offer chart size legend where you can see in detail what measures stand for each size number.

  5. Fabric content
  6. Since you cannot feel the materials of the clothes, read the fabric content. All good online clothing shops note the fabric content of each item in detail. Do not rely on an image to buy your clothing online. You are more likely to be unfortunate surprised with your choice.

  7. Research your online clothing store before buying from it
  8. There are clothing e-retailers that are quite disloyal. Often you pay for something that turns out to be different from what you have expected. Sometimes purchases take a lot longer time to arrive etc. You can find a lot of fashion forums, blogs about apparel and social networks where you can search for a loyal clothing e-store like SpiralFashion.com that offers trendy apparel.

Online shopping for clothes saves time and money, but do it the right way. Shop reasonably.

Home Buyers and Sellers Real Estate Glossary

Every business has it’s jargon and residential real estate is no exception. Mark Nash author of 1001 Tips for Buying and Selling a Home shares commonly used terms with home buyers and sellers.

1031 exchange or Starker exchange: The delayed exchange of properties that qualifies for tax purposes as a tax-deferred exchange.

1099: The statement of income reported to the IRS for an independent contractor.

A/I: A contract that is pending with attorney and inspection contingencies.

Accompanied showings: Those showings where the listing agent must accompany an agent and his or her clients when viewing a listing.

Addendum: An addition to; a document.

Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM): A type of mortgage loan whose interest rate is tied to an economic index, which fluctuates with the market. Typical ARM periods are one, three, five, and seven years.

Agent: The licensed real estate salesperson or broker who represents buyers or sellers.

Annual percentage rate (APR): The total costs (interest rate, closing costs, fees, and so on) that are part of a borrower’s loan, expressed as a percentage rate of interest. The total costs are amortized over the term of the loan.

Application fees: Fees that mortgage companies charge buyers at the time of written application for a loan; for example, fees for running credit reports of borrowers, property appraisal fees, and lender-specific fees.

Appointments: Those times or time periods an agent shows properties to clients.

Appraisal: A document of opinion of property value at a specific point in time.

Appraised price (AP): The price the third-party relocation company offers (under most contracts) the seller for his or her property. Generally, the average of two or more independent appraisals.

“As-is”: A contract or offer clause stating that the seller will not repair or correct any problems with the property. Also used in listings and marketing materials.

Assumable mortgage: One in which the buyer agrees to fulfill the obligations of the existing loan agreement that the seller made with the lender. When assuming a mortgage, a buyer becomes personally liable for the payment of principal and interest. The original mortgagor should receive a written release from the liability when the buyer assumes the original mortgage.

Back on market (BOM): When a property or listing is placed back on the market after being removed from the market recently.

Back-up agent: A licensed agent who works with clients when their agent is unavailable.

Balloon mortgage: A type of mortgage that is generally paid over a short period of time, but is amortized over a longer period of time. The borrower typically pays a combination of principal and interest. At the end of the loan term, the entire unpaid balance must be repaid.

Back-up offer: When an offer is accepted contingent on the fall through or voiding of an accepted first offer on a property.

Bill of sale: Transfers title to personal property in a transaction.

Board of REALTORS® (local): An association of REALTORS® in a specific geographic area.

Broker: A state licensed individual who acts as the agent for the seller or buyer.

Broker of record: The person registered with his or her state licensing authority as the managing broker of a specific real estate sales office.

Broker’s market analysis (BMA): The real estate broker’s opinion of the expected final net sale price, determined after acquisition of the property by the third-party company.

Broker’s tour: A preset time and day when real estate sales agents can view listings by multiple brokerages in the market.

Buyer: The purchaser of a property.

Buyer agency: A real estate broker retained by the buyer who has a fiduciary duty to the buyer.

Buyer agent: The agent who shows the buyer’s property, negotiates the contract or offer for the buyer, and works with the buyer to close the transaction.

Carrying costs: Cost incurred to maintain a property (taxes, interest, insurance, utilities, and so on).

Closing: The end of a transaction process where the deed is delivered, documents are signed, and funds are dispersed.

CLUE (Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange): The insurance industry’s national database that assigns individuals a risk score. CLUE also has an electronic file of a properties insurance history. These files are accessible by insurance companies nationally. These files could impact the ability to sell property as they might contain information that a prospective buyer might find objectionable, and in some cases not even insurable.

Commission: The compensation paid to the listing brokerage by the seller for selling the property. A buyer may also be required to pay a commission to his or her agent.

Commission split: The percentage split of commission compen-sation between the real estate sales brokerage and the real estate sales agent or broker.

Competitive Market Analysis (CMA): The analysis used to provide market information to the seller and assist the real estate broker in securing the listing.

Condominium association: An association of all owners in a condominium.

Condominium budget: A financial forecast and report of a condominium association’s expenses and savings.

Condominium by-laws: Rules passed by the condominium association used in administration of the condominium property.

Condominium declarations: A document that legally establishes a condominium.

Condominium right of first refusal: A person or an association that has the first opportunity to purchase condominium real estate when it becomes available or the right to meet any other offer.

Condominium rules and regulation: Rules of a condominium association by which owners agree to abide.

Contingency: A provision in a contract requiring certain acts to be completed before the contract is binding.

Continue to show: When a property is under contract with contingencies, but the seller requests that the property continue to be shown to prospective buyers until contingencies are released.

Contract for deed: A sales contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property but the seller holds title until the loan is paid. Also known as an installment sale contract.

Conventional mortgage: A type of mortgage that has certain limitations placed on it to meet secondary market guidelines. Mortgage companies, banks, and savings and loans underwrite conventional mortgages.

Cooperating commission: A commission offered to the buyer’s agent brokerage for bringing a buyer to the selling brokerage’s listing.

Cooperative (Co-op): Where the shareholders of the corporation are the inhabitants of the building. Each shareholder has the right to lease a specific unit. The difference between a co-op and a condo is in a co-op, one owns shares in a corporation; in a condo one owns the unit fee simple.

Counteroffer: The response to an offer or a bid by the seller or buyer after the original offer or bid.

Credit report: Includes all of the history for a borrower’s credit accounts, outstanding debts, and payment timelines on past or current debts.

Credit score: A score assigned to a borrower’s credit report based on information contained therein.

Curb appeal: The visual impact a property projects from the street.

Days on market: The number of days a property has been on the market.

Decree: A judgment of the court that sets out the agreements and rights of the parties.

Disclosures: Federal, state, county, and local requirements of disclosure that the seller provides and the buyer acknowledges.

Divorce: The legal separation of a husband and wife effected by a court decree that totally dissolves the marriage relationship.

DOM: Days on market.

Down payment: The amount of cash put toward a purchase by the borrower.

Drive-by: When a buyer or seller agent or broker drives by a property listing or potential li
sting.

Dual agent: A state-licensed individual who represents the seller and the buyer in a single transaction.

Earnest money deposit: The money given to the seller at the time the offer is made as a sign of the buyer’s good faith.

Escrow account for real estate taxes and insurance: An account into which borrowers pay monthly prorations for real estate taxes and property insurance.

Exclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are excluded from the contract or offer to purchase.

Expired (listing): A property listing that has expired per the terms of the listing agreement.

Fax rider: A document that treats facsimile transmission as the same legal effect as the original document.

Feedback: The real estate sales agent and/or his or her client’s reaction to a listing or property. Requested by the listing agent.

Fee simple: A form of property ownership where the owner has the right to use and dispose of property at will.

FHA (Federal Housing Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee by the FHA that a percentage of a loan will be underwritten by a mortgage company or banker.

Fixture: Personal property that has become part of the property through permanent attachment.

Flat fee: A predetermined amount of compensation received or paid for a specific service in a real estate transaction.

For sale by owner (FSBO): A property that is for sale by the owner of the property.

Gift letter: A letter to a lender stating that a gift of cash has been made to the buyer(s) and that the person gifting the cash to the buyer is not expecting the gift to be repaid. The exact wording of the gift letter should be requested of the lender.

Good faith estimate: Under the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, within three days of an application submission, lenders are required to provide in writing to potential borrowers a good faith estimate of closing costs.

Gross sale price: The sale price before any concessions.

Hazard insurance: Insurance that covers losses to real estate from damages that might affect its value.

Homeowner’s insurance: Coverage that includes personal liability and theft insurance in addition to hazard insurance.

HUD/RESPA (Housing and Urban Development/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act): A document and statement that details all of the monies paid out and received at a real estate property closing.

Hybrid adjustable rate: Offers a fixed rate the first 5 years and then adjusts annually for the next 25 years.

IDX (Internet Data Exchange): Allows real estate brokers to advertise each other’s listings posted to listing databases such as the multiple listing service.

Inclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are included in a contract or offer to purchase.

Independent contractor: A real estate sales agent who conducts real estate business through a broker. This agent does not receive salary or benefits from the broker.

Inspection rider: Rider to purchase agreement between third party relocation company and buyer of transferee’s property stating that property is being sold “as is.” All inspection reports conducted by the third party company are disclosed to the buyer and it is the buyer’s duty to do his/her own inspections and tests.

Installment land contract: A contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property while the seller retains the title to the property until the loan is paid.

Interest rate float: The borrower decides to delay locking their interest rate on their loan. They can float their rate in expectation of the rate moving down. At the end of the float period they must lock a rate.

Interest rate lock: When the borrower and lender agree to lock a rate on loan. Can have terms and conditions attached to the lock.

List date: Actual date the property was listed with the current broker.

List price: The price of a property through a listing agreement.

Listing: Brokers written agreement to represent a seller and their property. Agents refer to their inventory of agreements with sellers as listings.

Listing agent: The real estate sales agent that is representing the sellers and their property, through a listing agreement.

Listing agreement: A document that establishes the real estate agent’s agreement with the sellers to represent their property in the market.

Listing appointment: The time when a real estate sales agent meets with potential clients selling a property to secure a listing agreement.

Listing exclusion: A clause included in the listing agreement when the seller (transferee) lists his or her property with a broker.

Loan: An amount of money that is lent to a borrower who agrees to repay the amount plus interest.

Loan application: A document that buyers who are requesting a loan fill out and submit to their lender.

Loan closing costs: The costs a lender charges to close a borrower’s loan. These costs vary from lender to lender and from market to market.

Loan commitment: A written document telling the borrowers that the mortgage company has agreed to lend them a specific amount of money at a specific interest rate for a specific period of time. The loan commitment may also contain conditions upon which the loan commitment is based.

Loan package: The group of mortgage documents that the borrower’s lender sends to the closing or escrow.

Loan processor: An administrative individual who is assigned to check, verify, and assemble all of the documents and the buyer’s funds and the borrower’s loan for closing.

Loan underwriter: One who underwrites a loan for another. Some lenders have investors underwrite a buyer’s loan.

Lockbox: A tool that allows secure storage of property keys on the premises for agent use. A combo uses a rotating dial to gain access with a combination; a Supra® (electronic lockbox or ELB) features a keypad.

Managing broker: A person licensed by the state as a broker who is also the broker of record for a real estate sales office. This person manages the daily operations of a real estate sales office.

Marketing period: The period of time in which the transferee may market his or her property (typically 45, 60, or 90 days), as directed by the third-party company’s contract with the employer.

Mortgage banker: One who lends the bank’s funds to borrowers and brings lenders and borrowers together.

Mortgage broker: A business that or an individual who unites lenders and borrowers and processes mortgage applications.

Mortgage loan servicing company: A company that collects monthly mortgage payments from borrowers.

Multiple listing service (MLS): A service that compiles available properties for sale by member brokers.

Multiple offers: More than one buyers broker present an offer on one property where the offers are negotiated at the same time.

National Association of REALTORS® (NAR): A national association comprised of real estate sales agents.

Net sales price: Gross sales price less concessions to the buyers.

Off market: A property listing that has been removed from the sale inventory in a market. A property can be temporarily or permanently off market.

Offer to purchase: When a buyer proposes certain terms and presents these terms to the seller.

Office tour/caravan: A walking or driving tour by a real estate sales office of listings represented by agents in the office. Usually held on a set day and time.

Parcel identification number (PIN): A taxing authority’s tracking number for a property.

Pending: A real estate contract that has been accepted on a property but the transaction has not closed.

Personal assistant: A real estate sales agent administrative assistant.

Planned unit development (PUD): Mixed-use development that sets aside areas for residential use, commercial use, and public areas such as schools, parks, and so on.

Preapproval: A higher level of buyer/borrower prequalification required by a mortgage lender. Some preapprovals have conditions the borrowe
r must meet.

Prepaid interest: Funds paid by the borrower at closing based on the number of days left in the month of closing.

Prepayment penalty: A fine imposed on the borrower by the lender when the loan is paid off before it comes due.

Prequalification: The mortgage company tells a buyer in advance of the formal mortgage application, how much money the borrower can afford to borrow. Some prequalifications have conditions that the borrower must meet.

Preview appointment: When a buyer’s agent views a property alone to see if it meets his or her buyer’s needs.

Pricing: When the potential seller’s agent goes to the potential listing property to view it for marketing and pricing purposes.

Principal: The amount of money a buyer borrows.

Principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI): The four parts that make up a borrower’s monthly mortgage payment. Private mortgage insurance (PMI): A special insurance paid by a borrower in monthly installments, typically of loans of more than 80 percent of the value of the property.

Professional designation: Additional nonlicensed real estate education completed by a real estate professional.

Professional regulation: A state licensing authority that oversees and disciplines licensees.

Promissory note: A promise-to-pay document used with a contract or an offer to purchase.

R & I: Estimated and actual repair and improvement costs.

Real estate agent: An individual who is licensed by the state and who acts on behalf of his or her client, the buyer or seller. The real estate agent who does not have a broker’s license must work for a licensed broker.

Real estate contract: A binding agreement between buyer and seller. It consists of an offer and an acceptance as well as consideration (i.e., money).

REALTOR®: A registered trademark of the National Association of REALTORS® that can be used only by its members.

Release deed: A written document stating that a seller or buyer has satisfied his or her obligation on a debt. This document is usually recorded.

Relist: Property that was listed with another broker but relisted with a current broker.

Rider: A separate document that is attached to a document in some way. This is done so that an entire document does not need to be rewritten.

Salaried agent: A real estate sales agent or broker who receives all or part of his or her compensation in real estate sales in the form of a salary.

Sale price: The price paid for a listing or property.

Seller (owner): The owner of a property who has signed a listing agreement or a potential listing agreement.

Showing: When a listing is shown to prospective buyers or the buyer’s agent (preview).

Special assessment: A special and additional charge to a unit in a condominium or cooperative. Also a special real estate tax for improvements that benefit a property.

State Association of REALTORS®: An association of REALTORS® in a specific state.

Supra®: An electronic lockbox (ELB) that holds keys to a property. The user must have a Supra keypad to use the lockbox.

Temporarily off market (TOM): A listed property that is taken off the market due to illness, travel, needed repairs, and so on.

Temporary housing: Housing a transferee occupies until permanent housing is selected or becomes available.

Transaction: The real estate process from offer to closing or escrow.

Transaction management fee (TMF): A fee charged by listing brokers to the seller as part of the listing agreement.

Transaction sides: The two sides of a transaction, sellers and buyers. The term used to record the number of transactions in which a real estate sales agent or broker was involved during a specific period.

24-hour notice: Allowed by law, tenants must be informed of showing 24 hours before you arrive.

Under contract: A property that has an accepted real estate contract between seller and buyer.

VA (Veterans Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee on a mortgage amount backed by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Virtual tour: An Internet web/cd-rom-based video presentation of a property.

VOW’s (Virtual Office web sites): An Internet based real estate brokerage business model that works with real estate consumers in same way as a brick and mortar real estate brokerage.

W-2: The Internal Revenue form issued by employer to employee to reflect compensation and deductions to compensation.

W-9: The Internal Revenue form requesting taxpayer identification number and certification.

Walk-through: A showing before closing or escrow that permits the buyers one final tour of the property they are purchasing.

Will: A document by which a person disposes of his or her property after death.

Career Options – Travel for the Mobile RN

Career Traveling for the mobile registered nurse; the importance of doing your homework before you start traveling.

You’ve got your RN certification. You’ve worked for two or more years in your clinical specialty. Along the way you may have had the opportunity to work with a mobile professional. You see advertisements for RN’s with your career experience to work in faraway places. What’s your next step to perhaps broadening your career and professional experience?

By performing a detailed self-assessment and research into the travel health care industry you can first decide if traveling is for you and what prospective company is best for your career.

In your self-assessment analyze your strengths and weaknesses? Is your confidence level high? How about interpersonal skills? Do you enjoy meeting new people? Do you enjoy or embrace change? Do you adapt easily to changing circumstances? Are you independent? Are your nursing skills above average? Do you enjoy solving problems? Are you flexible?

If you answered yes to these questions you may be ready to take the next step and become a travel nurse. Now what are your main reasons for hitting the road? Is it the pay and benefits? How about the contract facility’s reputation? Or maybe it’s the thought of getting away from hospital politics and working under different management styles and medical environments.

In determining which company is right for you first collect appropriate employer information from a variety of agencies. Call managers at prospective employers to get a feel of the working environment. Get the names of two or more travel nurses who are currently working at the location, or recently worked there and call them to get their impressions of working at that particular location.

Weight different types and features of benefit packages. Pay particular attention to expense reimbursements, cash incentives or bonuses, and length of assignments. Will you be guaranteed 40 hours a week, and what shifts will you work, will overtime and on-call be mandatory are all important questions to be answered.

Other important considerations to determine are why the contract facility needs travel nurses? Are the travel nurses temporary or are they trying to manage a high patient load?

Will there be penalties if you fail to complete your assignment? Will you forfeit bonuses or have to pay back travel reimbursements or housing costs if you go home early?

Larger employment agencies many times offer a greater variety of assignments. They may also offer a wide range of benefits. Smaller agencies normally provide more personalized service and possible unique practice settings. In determining the agency that’s right for you the key is to choose the one that will work with you to meet your career and personal goals.

Finally, you don’t want to forget to evaluate the hospital. Many have seen the advantages of adding supplemental staffing through the hiring of travelers. Some even have their own travel divisions and offer state of-the-art pay and benefit packages. Assignments can range from seasonal to as short as thirteen weeks or less. Also, they may offer opportunities with other facilities within their health care system.

If you spend the time carefully evaluating and comparing potential employers and agencies you can make your first travel experience one that will broaden you career experience. Additional benefits include increased income and the opportunities to meet many exciting personal and professional challenges.